yogyakarta 2019

what makes you who you are written in light grey text on black square

A project by Caglar Kimyoncu

Collaborating Organization: Padepokan Seni Bagong Kussudiardja (PSBK), Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Producers: PSBK & Iteq Fitri Kristiyoarti (Indonesia); filmpro & Chas de Swiet (UK)

7 January 2019 – 6 February 2019 (Production and Installation)

7 February 2019: Exhibition Launch

8 February – 2 March 2019 (tbc): Exhibition and Workshops

Artist Caglar Kimyoncu explores the question “What Makes You Who You Are” in an interactive, transmedia exhibition at Padepokan Seni Bagong Kussudiardja (PSBK) in Yogyakarta. Incorporating video installation, augmented reality (AR), an online blog and related workshops, the project looks at identity, and how people define themselves in relation to culture, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexuality and disability.

This new project follows up on Caglar’s British-Council sponsored Research and Development at PSBK in 2018, as well as collaborative work in Makassar and Jakarta that culminated in installations at the groundbreaking Bebas Batas exhibition at the National Gallery of Indonesia, the country’s first exhibition by Deaf and disabled artists.

“What makes you who you are” will originate from PSBK’s main gallery but will use the entire site, with its fluid boundaries between interiors, exteriors and the surrounding village. Stories and characters will be introduced in the main gallery space through the use of monitors and artefacts. The audience will get to know more about the characters, their lives and relationships with other people through the AR experience situated throughout the PSBK location.

Augmented Reality (AR) is an interactive experience of a real-world environment whose elements are “augmented” by extra layers of digital content experienced through a mobile device, i.e., smart phone or tablet. This variety of presentation modes reflects the intersectionality of ‘identity’ and will also provide an excellent platform for creating accessible work for diverse communication needs. For example, AR markers and QR codes situated throughout the exhibition will be activated to reveal captioning of dialogue for Deaf and hard of hearing audiences, as well as audio description of visual information and an audio guide to the site for blind and partially sighted people.

The piece will be developed through interviews with a diverse range of subjects, followed by a period of improvisation with three local actors, who will collaborate on the creation of scenes and portraits exploring the theme. The improvisations will be filmed and edited to form the central elements of the installation, alongside the recorded interviews.

The project will also include a workshop on accessible and inclusive artistic practice, open to the public, as well as in-house workshops for artist residents and staff at PSBK.